A critical analysis of mark twains best work huckleberry finn

Bawdy humor and a realistic portrayal of the new American frontier were quickly displacing the refined culture of the New England literary circle. The attack was not surprising, for the new authors, such as Mark Twain, had risen from middle-class values, and thus they were in direct contrast to the educated and genteel writers who had come before them.

As with her snuff-taking—which was all right because she did it herself—there seems to be no relationship between her fundamental sense of humanity and justice and her religion. In contrast to the restrictive and oppressive social world of the shore, the raft is a veritable Eden away from the evils of civilization.

The Romantic literary movement began in the late eighteenth century and prospered into the nineteenth century. William Dean Howells described the new movement as "nothing more and nothing less than the truthful treatment of material. The picaresque form of the novel and its structural rhythm are based on a series of episodes on shore, after each of which Huck and Jim return to the peaceful sanctuary of the raft.

Through the adventures of an escaped slave and a runaway boy, both representatives of the ignorant and lowly of the earth, Mark Twain affirms that true humanity is of humans rather than institutions. What Huck and Jim seek is freedom, and this freedom is sharply contrasted with the existing civilization along the great river.

It is here that Jim and Huck can allow their natural bond of love to develop without regard for the question of race. In Huck Finn, this contrast reveals itself in the guise of Tom and Huck.

Described as a revolt against the rationalism that had defined the Neo-Classical movement dominate during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuryRomanticism placed heavy emphasis on imagination, emotion, and sensibility.

While the developing relationship between Huck and Jim determines the basic shape of the novel, the river also works in other structural ways. Heroic feats, dangerous adventures, and inflated prose marked the resulting literature, which exalted the senses and emotion over intellect and reason.

Mark Twain (1835-1910)

Literary Realism strove to depict an America as it really was, unfettered by Romanticism and often cruel and harsh in its reality. Freedom exists neither in the North nor in the South but in the ideal and idyllic world of the raft and river. Huck, on the one hand, accepts without question what he has been taught about slavery by church and society.

In both cases, Mark Twain is attacking the mindless acceptance of values that he believed kept the South in its dark age. Southern romanticism, which Mark Twain blamed for the fall of the South, is particularly allegorized by the wreck of the steamboat Walter Scott, but it is also inherent in such episodes as the feud, where Mark Twain shows the real horror of the sort of situation traditionally glamorized by romantic authors.

The more Tom tries to convince Huck and the rest of the boys that they are stealing jewelry from Arabs and Spaniards, the more ridiculous the scene becomes. When the boys come together at the beginning of the novel to create a band of robbers, Tom tells the gang that if anyone whispers their secrets, the boy and his entire family will be killed.

Rather than simply attacking an institution already legally dead, Mark Twain uses the idea of slavery as a metaphor for all social bondage and injustice.

By the end of the s, however, the great age of Romanticism appeared to be reaching its zenith. Representing the Romantic movement, Tom gleefully pulls the logical Huck into his schemes and adventures.

It is here on the raft that Jim can become a surrogate father to Huck, and Huck can develop the depth of feeling for Jim which eventually leads to his decision to imperil his soul.

It is almost irrelevant that Mark Twain has Huck and Jim running deeper into the South rather than north toward free soil. The skill with which Mark Twain elevates the dialect of an illiterate village boy to the highest levels of poetry established the spoken American idiom as a literary language and earned for Mark Twain the reputation, proclaimed for him by Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, and many others, as the father of the modern American novel.Topic: Critical Reviews of Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn Negative Critiques of the novel: San Francisco Evening Bulletin, March 14, “It is an amusing story, if such scrap-work can be called a.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Critical Evaluation - Essay

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Critical and Literary Analysis Mark Twain is one of America's best-known authors. In Huckleberry Finn, Twain addresses--through the character of Huck Finn--a variety of ideas that conflict with one another. Use CliffsNotes' The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Study Guide today to ace your next test!

Get free homework help on Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: book summary, chapter summary and analysis and original text, quotes, essays, and character analysis -- courtesy of CliffsNotes.

Resources: Two comprehensive sources for criticism of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn are the EDSITEment-reviewed Mark Twain in His Times, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Contemporary Reviews, and Huckleberry Finn Debated,edited by Jim Zwick, a link from the EDSITEment-reviewed Internet Public Library.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, a novel written by Mark Twain, is an important literary work because of it's use of satire.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

It is a story written about a boy, Huck, in search of freedom and adventure. Little could Mark Twain have visualized in when he began a sequel to capitalize on the success of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer () that Adventures of Huckleberry Finn would come to be.

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A critical analysis of mark twains best work huckleberry finn
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